Hello and welcome! Please understand that this website is not affiliated with Coty in any way, it is only a reference page for collectors and those who have enjoyed the classic fragrances of days gone by.

The main objective of this website is to chronicle the history of the Coty fragrances and showcase the bottles and advertising used throughout the years.

However, one of the other goals of this website is to show the present owners of the Coty perfume company how much we miss the discontinued classics and hopefully, if they see that there is enough interest and demand, they will bring back these fragrances!

Please leave a comment below (for example: of why you liked the fragrance, describe the scent, time period or age you wore it, who gave it to you or what occasion, any specific memories, what it reminded you of, maybe a relative wore it, or you remembered seeing the bottle on their vanity table), who knows, perhaps someone from the current Coty brand might see it.

Also, this website is a labor of love, it is a work in progress and is always being updated with new information as I can find it, so check back often!

Thursday, April 19, 2018

L'Or c1912

L'Or by Coty: Originally created in 1912, introduced to the USA in 1916. Created by Vincent Roubert who reportedly took five years to perfect the formula. In 1913 the fragrance was available in parfum, toilet water, face powder and sachet.

The Times Herald, 1925:
"L'Or: the golden lure of strange quests; gilt sailed argosies with high prows breasting the foam of unknown seas toward the gal of all desires. Leaping, glowing soul of flames; subtle fragrance of the golden blonde of sunset hair and eyes, symbol of the unquenchable dream within the hearts of men, alluring, inspiring to high endeavor. It is an exquisite perfume for cigarettes. A few drops on a bit of silk kept in the box gives them a delicate, fascinating balminess, breathing out in smoke, the fragrance of her it expresses."

The fragrance was relaunched with much fanfare in a gorgeous Baccarat crystal flacon in 1959. In 1960, it was said to be the world's most expensive fragrance, as one ounce in that Baccarat bottle cost $60.



c1960 ad




Fragrance Composition:


So what does it smell like? The original 1912 version was classified as an oriental fragrance for women and was according to a 1913 ad "very similar to L'Origan". It had notes of flowers and tobacco.
  • Top notes: lemon, galbanum, bergamot, lilac, neroli, heliotrope
  • Middle notes: mimosa, iris, rose, honeysuckle, jasmine, hyacinth, violet, spices, labdanum, orange blossom
  • Base notes: Indian musk, cedar, Mysore sandalwood, ambergris, orris, patchouli, vetiver, Venezuelan tonka bean, civet, Mexican vanilla, tobacco, benzoin


A 1923 ad states that L'Or is a "Glowing, vivid heart of flames, perfume of golden blondes of irresistible charm."





The 1959 version is classified as a floral leathery chypre fragrance for women.
  • Top notes: aldehydes, lemon, galbanum, bergamot, lilac, neroli, heliotrope
  • Middle notes: mimosa, iris, rose, honeysuckle, jasmine, hyacinth, violet, spices, labdanum, orange blossom
  • Base notes: Indian musk, cedar, Mysore sandalwood, ambergris, orris, patchouli, vetiver, Venezuelan tonka bean, civet, Mexican vanilla, leather, benzoin


Bottle:

Moth Stopper Parfum Flacon:

The original L'Or perfume from 1912 was presented in bottles made by Rene Lalique. The Rene Lalique designed bottle features a double moth frosted glass stopper. This bottle was originally designed by Lalique for the Coty fragrance Muguet in 1912, but was later used for almost all of the Coty fragrances.





This bottle was also made by Baccarat in 1913, mold number 241. These bottles should be acid marked Baccarat on the base. The Baccarat bottle can be found standing at 3.25' tall.





This was later made by Coty's own glassworks and will be marked "Coty" on the base. The Coty marked bottle holds 1.6 oz of parfum and stands 3.25" tall, it was housed inside of a green leather covered box.

This bottle was adapted for travelling by the usage of an inner glass stopper and a brass screw cap, this bottle was made by Baccarat, model number 291.



 Then in 1913, another Baccarat bottle was made for various Coty perfumes, model number 225. This was a tall, square shape with a cut crystal lapidary stopper.

After 1920, bottles were made at Coty's own glassworks in France. The 1920s parfum bottles came in two sizes: 1 oz and 2 oz. The 1920s toilet water bottles came in three sizes: 3 oz, 6 oz, 8.5 oz.







Etui a Cigarette Presentation:

Also introduced in 1927, was the Etui a Cigarette presentation for parfum. The bottle measures 3 3/4" tall.




I believe L'Or was discontinued for many years before being relaunched in 1959. For the 1959 relaunch, L'Or's parfum was housed in an exquisite heavy Baccarat crystal flacon fashioned as an elongated teardrop shape with matching crystal stopper. A black velvet bow was wrapped around the neck of the bottle and a gold metallic paper label hung from the bow. This bottle was Baccarat model number 821 and stands 6.25" tall.








Fate of the Fragrance:

During the first World War, importations of Coty products to the United States from France were halted and American retailers has to rely on selling the only stock that remained on their shelves. Although the war ended in 1918, it wasn't until 1921 that regular importations to America resumed in full speed according to the newspaper ads I read. However, I did read that distribution to France and Italy were not disturbed. I believe that this was because raw materials needed to be grown, purchased and imported and perhaps access to bottles was not readily available. During WWI, Lalique's first factory was forced to close, but the construction of a new factory was soon begun in Wingen-sur-Moder, in the Alsace region. It was completed in 1921 and still produces Lalique crystal today.


Discontinued, date unknown, probably by 1970.




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